Eye stroke

 Eye stroke

When  an artery or vein within the eye becomes  blocked(also called an occlusion) referred to as an eye stroke. An eye stroke, otherwise known as anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) or a stroke of the optic nerve, is an ocular disease that begins suddenly and occurs without any warning.It will start out in one eye, either the left or the right, and regularly develops in the unaffected eye after a period of time. Just as strokes occur in other parts of the body because blood flow is blocked, our eye also may suffer damage when vital structures such as the retina and  optic nerve are cut off from nutrients and oxygen flowing through the blood. When a blockage  occurs in the blood vessels that supply the front of the optic nerve, an eye stroke occurs results in no nutrient and oxygen supply. Without nutrients and oxygen, nerve tissue is damaged and lost, resulting in vision loss.An eye stroke results in sudden, but painless, vision loss or distorted vision in one eye. The severity of the symptoms depends on where the blockage is located, and how much blood flow is blocked.

what causes Eye stroke

Trauma of the head or eye injury, are the main causes which  are associated with AION,other include  glaucoma, giant cell arteritis, lupus, Buerger’s disease, allergies, post-viral vasculitis, post-immunization, smoking, high blood pressure, syphilis, hypertension, migraines, diabetes, atherosclerosis, carotid occlusive disease, sickle cell disease, and acute hypotension.

Retinal artery occlusion

Retinal artery occlusion occurs when an artery to the retina is blocked. The retina is the light-sensitive lining of the back of the eye that records what we see. Retinal artery occlusions are typically caused when a blood clot (or embolus) from the heart or carotid artery in the neck travels to the eye.risk factors include

1)  high blood pressure (hypertension),

2)artery disease (especially in the carotid),

3)heart disease,

4)cholesterol problems, or

5)diabetes.

When the retina  is damaged,or   if  it is the central artery that becomes blocked (called a central retinal artery occlusion, or CRAO), the result is usually sudden, total vision loss, though some peripheral vision may be present.. If the blockage occurs in one of the arteries which branch off the central blood vessel (a branch retinal artery occlusion, BRAO), we will  experience a sudden loss of  peripheral vision , with central vision possibly being affected as well. In both cases, the loss of vision is usually painless.complications may include neovascularization of the retina or iris, neovascular glaucoma, or temporal arteritis.

 Retinal Vein Occlusion 

Retinal Vein Occlusion occurs when a vein within the retina is blocked  due to  blood clot (thrombus), this is called a retinal vein occlusion. It may be either a branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) or central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), depending on which blood vessel has the blockage. Retinal vein occlusion is most commonly seen in people with hardening of the arteries (arteriosclerosis), high blood pressure, or glaucoma. Symptoms include sudden, painless vision loss which can be mild or severe and may include blind spots, distorted vision, or loss of peripheral vision.

Treatment of Eye stroke

It is important to  have  our vision should be  checked routinely.E arly detection can prevent  from getting serious vision impairments. Even with prompt treatment, a retinal artery occlusion  results in permanent vision damage. Possible treatment for  Retinal Vein Occlusion  is a laser procedure called pan-retinal laser photocoagulation, This can help to  repair some retinal  damage. During this procedure, a special laser is used to make tiny burns that seal the retina and stop vessels from growing and leaking.  The laser is used to destroy all of the dead areas of retina where blood vessels have been closed. When these areas are treated with the laser, the retina stops manufacturing new blood vessels, and those that are already present tend to decrease or disappear.

Article publié pour la première fois le 18/10/2011

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