Breast stroke

A swimming stroke in which a person lies face down in the water and extends the arms in front of the head, then sweeps them both back laterally under the surface of the water.Also defined as stroke in which the arms are extended in front of the head and swept back on either side while the legs are drawn up beneath the body and thrust back together.  we also name it as, lazy breaststroke swimming style. We call it “paní Radová” breaststroke. In the olden days, the  wife of the town’s mayor used to be very respected individual, lazily strolling through the town with her nose held high. And this was translated into the swimming terms when someone swims very slow breaststroke with the head above the water at all times as if they are above anything else.  This type of breaststroke puts quite a lot of pressure on ones lower back since the swimmer needs to bend to keep the head above the water.

there are  four general principles for breast stroke

1) When a swimmer begins the stroke, they  “pulls” (sculls)themselves beyond the point where the hands began the stroke.

2) The hands and feet act like  wings creating lift and drag as they pull or kick through the water.

3) The weight of the water over the hands and the feet is important in keeping the hands and feet from slipping.

4) The hands and feet must be accelerated through the range of motion caring not to break the plane that they are sculling (pulling or kicking) on.                                                                              

                                                                           The swimmer should begin the arm stroke with arms extended at a slight angle down with the hands about 6 to 8 inches under the water. Hands should be side by side or slightly overlapping with the little finger pitched slightly up. The stroke begins with the little fingers leading the way and the wrists flexing outward. The arms sweep out and down. At the widest part of the stroke the fingers point down and the hands pitch in. The elbows are high with the hands below. On the insweep the hands accelerate to their fastest speed with the forearms and upper arms pressing in as one unit. The hands finish the stroke in a praying position and recover at the surface of the water. The hands should not be sculled past the shoulder.The head position is always in an up position with little up and down movement. Swimmers should look forward and slightly down during the arm recovery and kick portion of the stroke and above the water during the end of the insweep and breathing portion of the stroke.The first series of breaststroke drills focuses on proper kicking technique.  For the first drill, have swimmers insert a buoy between their knees before performing the breaststroke.  If the buoy slips or they are unable to hold it in place, wrap a large band around their knees.  The purpose of the drill is to keep the knees together which is an essential aspect of a successful breaststroke.  The Breaststroke is typically the most popular swim stroke among leisure swimmers and once perfected allows swimmers to enjoy swimming for a long time without tiring.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts